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cable stitch fabric

Cable stitch fabic is a knit fabric. The pattern looks like a plaited rope running lengthwise down the fabric. It is mainly used for sweaters.

rib stitch

A weft knit identified by vertical ribs on both sides of the fabric. A very resilient stitch. Combined with the tuck stitch, it is called rib-and-tuck stitch.

stitch

A single passage of a threaded needle through fabric and back again, as in sewing or embroidery. Stitches may be made by hand or done on a sewing machine to hold layers of fabric together or to clecorate fabric such as embroidery, stitchery, and needlepoint. The most commonly used hand stitches follow. See embroidery, needlepoint, and stitchery.

back stitch

A stitch taken backwards on top of another to lock the .stitch in place or for extra strength. The back stitch is often uscd to end a row of running stitches, but can also be used in a continuous row in the same way as a running stitch. See running stitch.

hemming stitch

A stitch used to finish the raw edge of a fabric, usually by turning up and catching the edge to another point on the fabric. The needle is inserted in a slanted direction into the edge being hemmed, then into the fabric which is to be oaught. Many other types of stitches can also be used for hemming. See hent.

running stitch

The basic lsand stitch. The needle is inserted into the fabric and then moved in and out, joining two sections of fabric together. The stitches formed are ideally of the same length on both the top and the bottom layer of the fabric.

stitchery

The contemporary approach to traditional embroidery in which the same basic stitches are used, but in a freer, less restricted manner to create their own form and shapes. The yarns used in stitchery go beyond traditional wool and silk embroidery floss. Anything can be used to make the stitches from ribbon and cord to narrow strips of fabric or even fishline. Stitchery may be used to decorate clothing, home furnishings items, and for wall hangings. Sec embroidery.

stockinette stitch

In hand weft knitting, characterized by vertical wales on the face and horizontal courses on the back of the fabric. See plain stitch.

topstitching

A decorative stitch that reinforces seams, pocket edges, or collars. lt is often done in a color that contrasts with the background fabric.

tuck stitch

A variation of a basic stitch in weft knitting to make a knobby, bumpy, knitted texture. Unknitted loops are slipped from one needle to another. On the following row, the unknitted loops are knitted as regular stitches.

cable stitch fabric

Cable stitch fabic is a knit fabric. The pattern looks like a plaited rope running lengthwise down the fabric. It is mainly used for sweaters.

chevron

Chevron is a design that forms horizontal rows of joined Vs. Another name for chevron is flame stitch.

embroidery

The term for a group of decorative, usually ornamental and nonfunctional needlework done with thread or yarn on fabric. Most machine embroidery is done by the Schiffli ma chine which can imitate many different hand embroidery stitches. Although embroidery is usually thaught of as being done in several colors, white work (white embroidery on white fabric) and black work (black embroidery on white fabric) are fairly common. Embroidery terms are tremendously variable, with different words being given to the same stitches in different countries, and even different sections of the same countries. Some of the most common embroidery stitches are beading, buttonhole stitch, chain stitch, chevron stitch, satin stitch, stem stitch, back stitch, and straight stitch.

jersey

A single knit fabric with plain stitches on the right side and purl stitches on the back. A weft-knitted rayon, acetate, or two-bar tricot-knitted rayon or acetate used for slips, gowns, and blouses. Jersey is also made of wool, cotton, silk, nylon, or blends of the newer synthetics. As an elastic knitted wool fabric, usually in stockinette stitch, jersey was first made on the Island of Jersey off the English coast and used for fishermans clothing. [t is also used for blouses, dresses, and basque shirts. The word jersey is also occasionally used as a synonym for any knit. See knitting, single knit, and purl knit.

you will find a wide selection of jersey fabrics at jerseyfabrics.net.

rib knit

A knit that consists of groups of alternate plain and purl stitches (the reverse of a plain knit with loops showing). Rib knit fabrics are stretchier and have a snugger fit than plain knits. Rib knit is frequently used at wrists, waists, and necklines of plain or patterned knit garments where it is called ribbing.

needlepoint lace

Lace made with a sewing or embroidery needle to form buttonhole stitches as the basis of the design.

Renaissance lace

A lace made of woven strips of fabric joined by flat stitches. See Battenberg lace.

loop

Any material (braid, fabric, and so forth) that is shaped into an oval and topstitched to a garment or encased into a seam and used as a buttonhole.

quilt

A fabric construction, usually thinner and less resilient than a comforter, most often used as a bed covering for added warmth. It consists of a layer of printed cotton muslin fabric, known as the quitt top, and backing fabric, also made of printed or solid cotton muslin fabric, with a layer of cotton, wool, or synthetic batting between. All three layers are sewn together with fine quilting (running) stitches that usually create a design of its own. Quilted bed coverings filled with down feathers are called eiderdowns or comforters. A patchwork quitt has a patchwork quitt top. See quilting, patchwark, and batting.

quilting

Stitching through two or more layers of fabric to form a design or pattern. The most common quilting design today is a diamand pattern, but quilting stitches (usually a short running stitch) may also be dane in abstract, pictorial, geometric, floral, or random patterns. Quilting stitches often are used to outline patchwork or applique designs on a quitt. See applique, quitt, and patchwork.

reembroidered lace

Lace with designs outlined in embroidery stitching. See embroidery.

rib stitch

A weft knit identified by vertical ribs on both sides of the fabric. A very resilient stitch. Combined with the tuck stitch, it is called rib-and-tuck stitch.

runless

A type of seamless nylon hosiery in a lock-stitch mesh.

set-in pockets

(or slash-)pockets made by cutting an opening in the garment and stitching the pocket to the inside of the garment so only the opening is visible.

sewing-knitting machine

The latest machine for making fabrics. In the best known of these, the malimo machine, the warp thread is placed on top of the filling thread and the two are stitched together with a third thread.

shirring

A method of gathering fabric to create decorative fullness. Shirring consists of three or more parallel rows of stitching, placed about 1/4'' to 1'' apart, and drawn up (gathered) together to form bands of controlled gathers. Shirring is used in clothing and in items of home furnishings.

smocking

Rows of shirring done in a pattern to add some give (stretch) to a gannent and for decoration. A common pattern of smocking is to gather the fabric with stitches that cross each other diagonally, forming a honeycomb-like pattern. It is often done with colored embroidery thread and gives an effect similar to shirring. See shirring.

stitch

A single passage of a threaded needle through fabric and back again, as in sewing or embroidery. Stitches may be made by hand or done on a sewing machine to hold layers of fabric together or to clecorate fabric such as embroidery, stitchery, and needlepoint. The most commonly used hand stitches follow. See embroidery, needlepoint, and stitchery.

back stitch

A stitch taken backwards on top of another to lock the .stitch in place or for extra strength. The back stitch is often uscd to end a row of running stitches, but can also be used in a continuous row in the same way as a running stitch. See running stitch.

hemming stitch

A stitch used to finish the raw edge of a fabric, usually by turning up and catching the edge to another point on the fabric. The needle is inserted in a slanted direction into the edge being hemmed, then into the fabric which is to be oaught. Many other types of stitches can also be used for hemming. See hent.

running stitch

The basic lsand stitch. The needle is inserted into the fabric and then moved in and out, joining two sections of fabric together. The stitches formed are ideally of the same length on both the top and the bottom layer of the fabric.

stitchery

The contemporary approach to traditional embroidery in which the same basic stitches are used, but in a freer, less restricted manner to create their own form and shapes. The yarns used in stitchery go beyond traditional wool and silk embroidery floss. Anything can be used to make the stitches from ribbon and cord to narrow strips of fabric or even fishline. Stitchery may be used to decorate clothing, home furnishings items, and for wall hangings. Sec embroidery.

stockinette stitch

In hand weft knitting, characterized by vertical wales on the face and horizontal courses on the back of the fabric. See plain stitch.

buttonhole twist

A thick, twisted silk cord. Buttonhole twist is lustrous and is used for topstitching. lt is also used for sewing buttons onto a garment as well as for making buttonholes or embroidery.

topstitching

A decorative stitch that reinforces seams, pocket edges, or collars. lt is often done in a color that contrasts with the background fabric.

twill tape

A narrow, twill-weave ribbon, fairly heavy in weight. lt is stitched into garment areas such as collar lapels, shoulders, and facing edges for strength and to prevent stretching. lt is also used in the seams of slip covers and other home furnishing items for added strength. Twill tape is usually available only in white and black. See weaving and twill.

tuck stitch

A variation of a basic stitch in weft knitting to make a knobby, bumpy, knitted texture. Unknitted loops are slipped from one needle to another. On the following row, the unknitted loops are knitted as regular stitches.

twill

(1) A weave with a diagonal rib (twill line) that runs from the upper left to the lower right, or from upper right to lower left. In a twill weave, each filling thread passes over or under at least two warp threads, to a point where the filling thread goes under moving up and over by at least one thread in each row. Herringbone weave is a broken twill weave and forms ""V""s in the weave pattern. (2) A narrow ribbon, fairly heavy in weight. It is stitched into garment areas such as collar lapels, shoulders, and facing edges for strength and to prevent stretching. It is also used in the seams of slipcovers and other home furnishings items for added strength. Twill tape usually is available only in white or black.

zipper

A garment closure made of interlocking teeth attached to strips of fabric known as the zipper tape. Zippers were originally made of metal, but are now available with polyester or nylon molded teeth on a woven or knit polyester tape. Most zippers are attached to garments by stitching the zipper tape to the garment seam. Invisible zippers do not show once they are attached to the garment because the teeth of an invisible zipper are covered by the zipper tape and hidden in the seam of the garment. Zippers come in every size and color and can be used functionally or decoratively.