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Search results for "lace"

aloe lace

A bobbin or tatted lace made from aloe plant (i.e. agave) fibers.

Belgian lace

Belgium lace is a term used for any lace made in Belgium. Originally the term described a bobbin lace worked on a machine-made net. Connected to: bobbin lace

bobbin lace

Bobbin lace is a lace made by using a pillow to hold the pins around which thread is arranged. Other names for bobbin lace are bobbinette lace and pillow lace.

lace

A decorated openwork fabric created by looping, interlacing, braiding, or twisting threads. [t is made (either on a background fabric of net or without a background fabric) with a design formed by a net work of threads made by hand or on special lace machines, with bobbins, needles, or hooks. The pattern in lace is usually open and most often floral in design. Machine-made lace is most commonly seen today and many patterns formerly only made by hand, are imitated by machine. hace is the traditional bridal fabric, but it is also used for other nonformal clothing such as sports clothes. The following entries are some of the major types of lace.

ajour lace

An open lace design with the pattern scattered on the ground.

allover lace

Lace in which the pattern covers the entire fabric, rather than being isolated on one section of background net.

antique lace

A heavy lace made on a square knotted net with designs darned onto the net. Machine-made antique lace is often used for curtains. See embroidery and darn.

crocheted lace

Lace made with a single yarn. A crochet hook is used to form loops joined to other loops to form the design.

hairpin lace

A delicate, narrow lace worked over a hairpin or a special hairpin-shaped, loom-like tool.

Irish lace

The term Irish lace can be used to refer to any lace made in Ireland, but crocheted laces are those most often given the name. Embroidered nets are another type of Irish lace. See crocheted lace.

needlepoint lace

Lace made with a sewing or embroidery needle to form buttonhole stitches as the basis of the design.

Nottingham lace

One of the first of the machinemade laces. It originated in Nottingham, England. Today, the term Nottingham lace is often used for any lace made by any machine.

Renaissance lace

A lace made of woven strips of fabric joined by flat stitches. See Battenberg lace.

Val lace

See Valenciennes lace.[1][1]See Venise lace. The name for the liquid form of natural or man-made rubber. It

Valenciennes lace

A flat babbin lace worked with one hand forming both the background and the design for the lace.

Venetian lace

See Venise lace

Venice lace

See Venise lace

Venise lace

A needlepoint lace usually in a floral pattern connected by picot edgings. It is also called Venice lace and Venetian lace. See picot.

Battenberg lace

A lace similar to Renaissance lace with a pattern formed by tape or braid joined by bars. See Renaissance lace.

Binche lace

A lace in which hand-made lace motifs are appliqued to a machine-made net ground. The name comes from Binche, a town in Belgium, where the lace is said to have originated.

bobbinet lace

See bobbin lace and pillow lace.

Breton lace

Lace made on open net, usually embroidered with very heavy, often brightly colored, yarns, Breton is the area in France where the lace is said to have originated.

Brussels lace

Brussels lace may be either a bobbin lace or a needlepointlace.It is usually worked on a machine-made ground and sometimes the designs are appliqued onto the ground. Because of the importance of Brussels, Belgium, in the history of lace-making (many patterns developed there), several different laces are called Brussels lace. See bobbin lace and needlepoint lace.

Cluny lace

A heavy lace, often made of thick cotton or man-made fibers using the bobbin method. It is the traditional lace for doilies and place mats, but is also used in apparel. See bobbin lace.

Leavers lace

Machine-made lace named for the inventor of the machine on which it is made. Many hand-made lace patterns can be copied on this machine. The term is sometimes used in preference to machine-made lace to imply quality.

placemat

A piece of cloth or other material (often foam-backed plastic) placed on a table between the table and the place setting to protect the table and to decorate it during meals. Placemats are available in a variety of sizes, shapes, and colors.

real lace

Hand-made lace. See lace.

reembroidered lace

Lace with designs outlined in embroidery stitching. See embroidery.

vafenciennes lace

A flat bobbin lace worked with one thread forming both the background and the design for lace.

ajour

An openwork design for lace or embroidery with the pattern scattered.

aloe lace

A bobbin or tatted lace made from aloe plant (i.e. agave) fibers.

Belgian lace

Belgium lace is a term used for any lace made in Belgium. Originally the term described a bobbin lace worked on a machine-made net. Connected to: bobbin lace

block printing

A hand-printing process in which a design is carved on a block of wood or linoleum. Dye is placed on the surface and the block is placed on the fabric, thereby transferring the dye. Every color requires a different block, making this type of printing tedious and expensive. It is now almost entirely limited to the craft field. See printing.

bobbin lace

Bobbin lace is a lace made by using a pillow to hold the pins around which thread is arranged. Other names for bobbin lace are bobbinette lace and pillow lace.

bunting

A loosely woven fabric used primarily for flags and draping. Bunting used in public places must be flameproof. Bunting is also a term used to describe a simple rectangular square of material in which a baby is wrapped for warmth.

China silk

China silk is a lightweight and soft fabric. This plain-weave silk fabric is used for lingerie and soft suits. Nowadays, China silk has been replaced almost completly with lining fabrics of man-made fibers.

frise

Lace made by using a pil

glitter

The name, sometimes used in place of lame, for any fabric woven or knitted with all metallic yarns or with a combination of metallic and other fiber yarns. Today, most glitter is made from one of the nontarnishable metallic fibers, a great improvement over lame of the past that tended to darken with age.

heat transfer

A form of printing in which elaborate colors and designs are printed onto a special type of paper. The paper is placed over the fabric and the designs and colors are transferred to the fabric through the application of heat.

interlining

A tayer of fabric placed between the outer fabric and the lining of the garment to add warmth. lt is most commonly found in coats and jackets. Interlinings are offen made of reprocessed wool, but other materials such as polyester fiberfill may be used. See fiberfill, reprocessed wool.

kapok

A fluffy fiber that comes from the seed pods of the kapok tree found in the tropics. Kapok at one tirne was extremely popular for stuffing pillows and was also used in life preservers as it is naturally buoyant. Today, rnan-made fibers have replaced kapok in many cases.

lace

A decorated openwork fabric created by looping, interlacing, braiding, or twisting threads. [t is made (either on a background fabric of net or without a background fabric) with a design formed by a net work of threads made by hand or on special lace machines, with bobbins, needles, or hooks. The pattern in lace is usually open and most often floral in design. Machine-made lace is most commonly seen today and many patterns formerly only made by hand, are imitated by machine. hace is the traditional bridal fabric, but it is also used for other nonformal clothing such as sports clothes. The following entries are some of the major types of lace.

ajour lace

An open lace design with the pattern scattered on the ground.

allover lace

Lace in which the pattern covers the entire fabric, rather than being isolated on one section of background net.

antique lace

A heavy lace made on a square knotted net with designs darned onto the net. Machine-made antique lace is often used for curtains. See embroidery and darn.

crocheted lace

Lace made with a single yarn. A crochet hook is used to form loops joined to other loops to form the design.

hairpin lace

A delicate, narrow lace worked over a hairpin or a special hairpin-shaped, loom-like tool.

Irish lace

The term Irish lace can be used to refer to any lace made in Ireland, but crocheted laces are those most often given the name. Embroidered nets are another type of Irish lace. See crocheted lace.

needlepoint lace

Lace made with a sewing or embroidery needle to form buttonhole stitches as the basis of the design.

Nottingham lace

One of the first of the machinemade laces. It originated in Nottingham, England. Today, the term Nottingham lace is often used for any lace made by any machine.

pillow face

Lace made by using a pillow to hold pins around which thread is arranged. See bobbin lace.br />

Renaissance lace

A lace made of woven strips of fabric joined by flat stitches. See Battenberg lace.

tatting

A method of lace-making worked with the fingers and a shuttle that holds the thread. Tatting forms a narrow, knotted lace, often used for edging.

Val lace

See Valenciennes lace.[1][1]See Venise lace. The name for the liquid form of natural or man-made rubber. It

Valenciennes lace

A flat babbin lace worked with one hand forming both the background and the design for the lace.

Venetian lace

See Venise lace

Venice lace

See Venise lace

Venise lace

A needlepoint lace usually in a floral pattern connected by picot edgings. It is also called Venice lace and Venetian lace. See picot.

Battenberg lace

A lace similar to Renaissance lace with a pattern formed by tape or braid joined by bars. See Renaissance lace.

beading

A type of lace made by the bobbin lace method. Also, an openwork lace or embroidery containing holes designed for the insertion of decorative ribbon. See bobbin lace.

Binche lace

A lace in which hand-made lace motifs are appliqued to a machine-made net ground. The name comes from Binche, a town in Belgium, where the lace is said to have originated.

bobbinet lace

See bobbin lace and pillow lace.

Breton lace

Lace made on open net, usually embroidered with very heavy, often brightly colored, yarns, Breton is the area in France where the lace is said to have originated.

Brussels lace

Brussels lace may be either a bobbin lace or a needlepointlace.It is usually worked on a machine-made ground and sometimes the designs are appliqued onto the ground. Because of the importance of Brussels, Belgium, in the history of lace-making (many patterns developed there), several different laces are called Brussels lace. See bobbin lace and needlepoint lace.

Chantilly

One of the most popular of bridal laces often used for the trimming on bridal veils. It is made by the bobbin method and has designs outlined by thick cords. See bobbin lace.

Cluny lace

A heavy lace, often made of thick cotton or man-made fibers using the bobbin method. It is the traditional lace for doilies and place mats, but is also used in apparel. See bobbin lace.

latex

The name for the liquid form of natural or man-made rubber. It can be formed into thread for use as an elastic yarn. Latex is also used extensively as part of the backing in the manufacture of rugs and at one time, was used extensively in corsets and brassieres. Now, however, although some latex foundation garments are still made, it has been largely replaced by spandex. Solid latex is sometimes referred to as rubber. See spandex.

Leavers lace

Machine-made lace named for the inventor of the machine on which it is made. Many hand-made lace patterns can be copied on this machine. The term is sometimes used in preference to machine-made lace to imply quality.

napkin

A rectangular piece of fabric or paper used to wipe the mouth and hands in the course of eating. Napkins are often matched to the tablecloth or placernats.

pillow cover

A fabric cover which is placed over the bed pillow before the pillowcase. Pillow covers are designed to give more protection to pillows than is provided by pillowcases alone. See pillowcase.

placemat

A piece of cloth or other material (often foam-backed plastic) placed on a table between the table and the place setting to protect the table and to decorate it during meals. Placemats are available in a variety of sizes, shapes, and colors.

runner

A rectangular piece of fabric used with placemats to decorate and protect the dining table. It is placed in the center of the table under condiments (salt, pepper, mustard) and any decorations such as flowers or candles. Runners frequently match the placemats and are also used on chests of drawers to protect the top from spills.

silence cloth

A cloth put on a dining table to protect it and (as the name suggests) to prevent the clatter of dishes against the table. A silence cloth is usually a napped, fairly heavy fabric. Silence cloths are placed beneath tablecloths and are also called silencers.

lingerie

Another term for womens underwear and nightwear, including panties, slips, petticoats, camisoles, pajamas, and nightgowns. Lingerie implies delicate fabric, often lace-trimmed. The term lingerie fabrics is occasionally used for very delicate fabrics. Formerly, the finest lingerie was made of muslin, lawn, or silk.

loop yarn

The slack-twisted strand is twisted to form loops or curls. This strand is held in place by one or two binder yarns.

mantilla

A lace scarf worn over the head.

mosquito netting

A coarsely meshed, net fabric used to make mosquito nets to place over windows and beds to keep mosquitoes out. See net.

real lace

Hand-made lace. See lace.

reembroidered lace

Lace with designs outlined in embroidery stitching. See embroidery.

ruff

A wheel-shaped collar made of several layers of fabric (usually lace) in S-shaped folds.

sewing-knitting machine

The latest machine for making fabrics. In the best known of these, the malimo machine, the warp thread is placed on top of the filling thread and the two are stitched together with a third thread.

sheet

A rectangular piece of fabric used to cover and protect the top and sides of a mattress. This is usually referred to as a bottom sheet. A top sheet is placed on top of a bottom sheet to protect the skin from a sometimes scratchy blanket and to protect the blanket from soil. Traditionally, sheets were made of linen or cotton.

shirring

A method of gathering fabric to create decorative fullness. Shirring consists of three or more parallel rows of stitching, placed about 1/4'' to 1'' apart, and drawn up (gathered) together to form bands of controlled gathers. Shirring is used in clothing and in items of home furnishings.

shoot

Another term for filling, weft, woof, and shute. The crosswise thread that interlaces with the warp threads on a woven fabric.

shoulder pad

A support placed in the shoulder area of a garment to give a wider look to the shoulder when this look is in style. A thinner version known as a shoulder shape is used in coats and suits to maintain shape and give support in the shoulder area. Shoulder pads and shoulder shapes are available in notions departments and in fabric stores. See findings.

shower curtain

A shower curtain is a length of fabric hung around a bathroorn shower or shower-tub combination to keep water from splashing out onto the floor. Shower curtains should be waterproof. When decorative, nonwaterproof shower curtains are used, a waterproof liner, usually made of plastic, should be placed inside.

shute

Another term for weft, woof, shoot, and filling. The crosswise thread that interlaces with the warp threads on a woven fabric.

silk

The product of the silk worm and the only natural filament fiber (it is produced in a long thread). Silk was the leading luxury fiber for thousands of years. There were many types of silk and many ways of making it into cloth. foday, man-made fibers have to a very large extent replaced silk, but the traditional names for certain silk fabrics are still used and include the following:

sizing

Starch, gelatin, glue, wax, casein, or clay added to fabrics in the finishing stages to give fabric additional body, a smoother appearance, and more weight. Cotton fabrics are those most commonly treated in this manner. At one time, sizing had to be replaced after each cleaning. Today, with more advanced finishing techniques, sizing is rarely used and fabrics usually retain their initial appearance through cleaning. A few fabrics such as needlepoint canvas are still sized so that they can be handled more easily. This in no way affects their final performance. Sizing also refers to the starch that is applied to the warp yarns to help prevent abrasion during the weaving process. This sizing is usually removed from the fabric in one of the finishing steps.

space dyeing

A method of dyeing yarn by dipping in dye or spotting in various places along the yarn. This causes different sections of the yarn to appear in different colors. The resulting fabric often has unusual, rainbow-like effects.

Spitalfields

An English town and the home of Huguenot weavers, it is now a lace-making center. In this town, the hand-woven Jacquard silk Spitalfields tie originated.

back stitch

A stitch taken backwards on top of another to lock the .stitch in place or for extra strength. The back stitch is often uscd to end a row of running stitches, but can also be used in a continuous row in the same way as a running stitch. See running stitch.

studs

Small, decorative objects added to fabric. They are usually round and metallic and are occasionally jewelled. Studs have teeth on the bottom that are pushed through the fabric by hand or with a tool called a stud setter. The teeth are then bent against the fabric to hold the stud in place.

stuff

Another name for fabric. Any braided, felted, woven, knitted, or nonwoven material, including cloth, hosiery, and lace. Stuff is also referred to as cloth, material, and goods.

swag

A decorative, draped fabric section placed over a window. Swags usually are used in conjunction with draperies or curtains.

cotton thread

Formerly the most common thread, but difficult to find today. lt is usually made in two types. A plain thread with a dull surface is called basting thread. Mercerized cotton thread has a shiny surface that enables it to slide smoothly through fabric and is suggested for general purpose sewing. Polyester thread has replaced cotton thread to a large extent. See mercerization.

galloon

A closely woven, flat braid used for accenting draperies and furniture. Also called braid. The term galloon is also used for any narrow fabric with decorative edges, such as scallops finished the same on each side. Lace made in this way is called galloon lace.

tufting

A brush-like button of clipped cotton yarn that appears at regular intervals on mattresses. Also, the most common method for making rugs. Groups of yarns are forced through a backing fabric. The yarns are held in place permanently when the underside of the rug is coated, often with liquid latex.

underlay

A synonym for padding or rug cushion. It usually describes the layer of fabric of sponge rubber or hair placed underneath a carpet or rug to provide it with longer life, to give it a more luxurious appearance and feeling, to prevent the rug from slipping, and to make the rug softer and more cushiony. Carpet padding is made of cattle hair, rubberized hair, rubber, and combinations of jute and cattle hair, as well as some man-made fibers. Sec: rugs and carpets, padding, and rug cushion.

vafenciennes lace

A flat bobbin lace worked with one thread forming both the background and the design for lace.

warp

The group of yarns placed first on a loom in weaving. Warp runs parallel to the selvage, forming the length of the fabric. The filling threads are interlaced over and under the warp threads in a pattern or weave. See weaving and selvage.

weft

Another name for filling, the crosswise thread that interlaces with the warp threads on a woven fabric. Other names are woof, shoot, and shute.

woof

Another name for filling, the crosswise thread that interlaces with the warp threads on a woven fabric. Other names are weft, shoot, and shute. See filling.